AP

Canada privacy watchdog taking Facebook to court

OTTAWA, Ontario (AP) — Canada's privacy czar is taking Facebook to court after finding the social media giant's lax practices allowed personal information to be used for political purposes.

A joint report from privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien and his British Columbia counterpart released Thursday says it uncovered major shortcomings in Facebook's procedures and called for stronger laws to protect Canadians.

The commissioners expressed dismay that Facebook had rebuffed their findings and recommendations.

Facebook insists it took the investigation seriously. The social media giant says it offered to enter into a compliance agreement.

The Canadian report comes as Ireland's privacy regulator says it's investigating Facebook over the social media giant's recent revelation that it had left hundreds of millions of user passwords exposed.

The Canadian probe followed reports that Facebook let an outside organization use an app to access users' personal information, and that some of the data was then passed to others. Recipients of the information included the firm Cambridge Analytica.

The app, at one point known as "This is Your Digital Life," encouraged users to complete a personality quiz but collected much more information about the people who installed the app as well as data about their Facebook friends, the commissioners said.

About 300,000 Facebook users worldwide added the app, leading to the potential disclosure of the personal information of approximately 87 million others, including more than 600,000 Canadians, the report said.

The commissioners concluded that Facebook broke Canada's privacy law governing companies by failing to obtain valid and meaningful consent of installing users and their friends, and that it had "inadequate safeguards" to protect user information.

Despite its public acknowledgment of a "major breach of trust" in the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook disputes the report's findings and refuses to implement recommendations, the commissioners said.

"Facebook's refusal to act responsibly is deeply troubling given the vast amount of sensitive information people have entrusted to this company," Therrien said. "The company's privacy framework was empty."

Therrien reiterated his longstanding call for the Canadian government to give him authority to issue binding orders to companies and levy fines for non-compliance with the law. In addition, he wants powers to inspect the practices of organizations.

The office of Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains, the Cabinet member responsible for Canada's private-sector privacy law, said the government would take concrete actions on privacy in coming weeks.

Facebook Canada spokeswoman Erin Taylor said the company was disappointed Therrien considers the issues unresolved.

"There's no evidence that Canadians' data was shared with Cambridge Analytica, and we've made dramatic improvements to our platform to protect people's personal information," Taylor said.

"We understand our responsibility to protect people's personal information, which is why we've proactively taken important steps toward tackling a number of issues raised in the report."

If the application to Federal Court is successful, it could lead to modest fines and an order for Facebook to revamp its privacy practices, Therrien said.

AP

Iraq veteran jailed after car plows into pedestrians; 8 hurt

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SUNNYVALE, Calif. (AP) — A former Army sharpshooter with a history of post-traumatic stress disorder plowed his car at high speed into a group of pedestrians in a Silicon Valley suburb, injuring eight people, then told authorities that he intentionally hit them, police said.

Isaiah Joel Peoples, 34, gave no indication why he targeted the group in Sunnyvale, California, authorities said. He was being held Thursday on eight counts of attempted murder. Four of the pedestrians remained hospitalized, including a 13-year-old girl who was in critical condition. Peoples was scheduled to appear in court Friday.

A witness said he watched in horror as the car sped through a crosswalk in a shopping area Tuesday evening and bodies went flying. It was a warm night, around dinnertime, and people were out in cafes and restaurants.

"I saw this woman fly through the air right in front of me. She flipped upside down and then fell right in front of my car," Don Draper said. He marched over to Peoples' car, which had swerved onto a sidewalk and crashed into a tree. He said Peoples did not appear drunk but looked dazed and was mumbling over and over, "Thank you, Jesus. Thank you, Jesus."

Sunnyvale Police Chief Phan Ngo declined to discuss details of interviews with Peoples and said police are still working to determine his motivation.

"When we took him into custody, he did not behave in any manner that would be considered bizarre," Ngo said. "He has not shown any remorse."

Though the FBI is assisting in the investigation, there is no evidence linking Peoples to any terrorist organization and, so far, no evidence of a federal crime, said Ngo, who said Peoples had picked up food and was on his way to deliver it to his Bible study group.

Investigators were processing evidence found Wednesday in a search of Peoples' apartment in Sunnyvale, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) south of San Francisco. Police also gave him a blood test for drugs and were checking into accounts from family members that he had a history of mental illness.

Family and friends described Peoples as quiet and polite and expressed shock at his involvement.

His mother, Leevell Peoples of Sacramento, said she could not imagine any situation in which her son would deliberately crash into innocent people other than something related to the PTSD she said he experienced after serving in Iraq.

"Unless the car malfunctioned, he would not have done that. He's like the perfect, model citizen," she said.

Her son graduated from Sacramento State University after returning from Iraq in 2007 and was working as an auditor for the Defense Department in nearby Mountain View, she said.

"He basically probably has no friends but the people he works with," she said. "He's an Army vet. He's a good kid, never been arrested. I promise you: It was not deliberate. If anything, it was that Army."

She said Peoples had "a bad episode" with PTSD in 2015, for which he was hospitalized, and has told her that he had been taking medication regularly since then.

The mother said the Army forced her son to retire because of PTSD. Pentagon spokeswoman Lt. Col Carla Gleason confirmed that he retired from the Army.

Peoples served as a civil affairs specialist in the Army Reserve from March 2004 to July 2009 and attained the rank of sergeant, and he was deployed to Iraq from June 2005 to May 2006, according to another Pentagon spokesman, Lt. Col. Emanuel Ortiz. He did not answer questions about whether Peoples' departure from the Army was due to PTSD.

Ngo said Thursday Peoples was honorably discharged from the Army and that police were investigating the PTSD report. He said Peoples has no criminal record and owned one weapon, a disassembled and inoperable shotgun that was in the trunk of his vehicle.

Other witness statements matched Draper's account that the driver was speeding and drove directly toward the pedestrians without trying to veer away or stop.

Six people were taken to hospitals, including the youngest victim, a 9-year-old boy who was treated and released.

Miguel Balbuena, 15, was on his bike waiting to cross when he heard a woman scream. He tried to get out of the way but failed. He's on crutches after a metal pole squeezed his leg.

"It's not something you see every day," he told television station KTVU, saying it was like a scene out of a movie. "It was really hard to see."

Isaiah Peoples' former housemate Chuck Herrera described him as quiet — someone who had to be coaxed into going out for drinks or dinner. He said Peoples was kind to Herrera's toddler son.

He recalls Peoples "always had a lot of pills" and a cough.

"The guy I met was not someone who you think will hurt someone," he said. "My guess is something happened."

———

Har reported from San Francisco. Associated Press writers Olga R. Rodriguez and Juliet Williams in San Francisco also contributed to this report.

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AP
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AP
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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A former Minneapolis police officer on trial in the fatal shooting of an unarmed woman who had called 911 to report a possible sexual assault near her home testified Thursday about his training for possible ambushes, saying he learned that reacting too late "means ... you die."

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AP
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